Aug 092019
 
IIS Logo Image

You may find yourself unable to download attachments on an e-mail message you received on your Android or Apple iPhone from your Microsoft Exchange Server. In my case, this presented a “Unable to download.” with a retry option. Retrying would not work.

If the attachment is larger (over 10MB), this is most likely due to a limit enforced on the Activesync site in IIS on your Exchange Server. In this post I’m going to tell you why this happens, and how to fix it!

The Problem

Microsoft Exchange uses IIS (Internet Information Server) for numerous services including ActiveSync. ActiveSync provides the connectivity to your mobile device for your Exchange access.

IIS has numerous limits configured to stop massive bogus requests, reduce DDOS attacks, and other reasons.

The Fix

To resolve this and allow the attachment to download, we need to modify two configuration values inside of the web.config file on IIS.

Below are the values we will be modifying:

  • MaxDocumentDataSize – Maximum file (message) data size for transfer. “Sets the maximum data size that we will fetch (range or othewise)”
  • maxRequestLength – “Specifies the limit for the input stream buffering threshold, in KB. This limit can be used to prevent denial of service attacks that are caused, for example, by users posting large files to the server. The default is 4096 KB.” (as per here)

These settings are configured in the following file:

C:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\V15\ClientAccess\Sync\web.config

Before modifying the variables, please make a copy or backup of the web.config file so you can restore.

After you make a backup, open the file in notepad (right click -> run as administrator), and open the web.config file.

Simply search for the two values listed above, and change them. In my case, I tripled the “MaxDocumentDataSize”, and the “maxRequestLength” values. Examples from my “web.config” file are below:

add key="MaxDocumentDataSize" value="30720000"
httpRuntime maxRequestLength="30720" fcnMode="Disabled"

After changing these, run the following command from an elevated (as administrator) command prompt to restart IIS:

iisreset

And bam, you’re good to go!

May 112012
 

I got a kick out of this. Yesterday someone decided to ask Siri what the best cell phone is.

Siri responded back saying it’s the Cyan color Nokia Lumia 900. How funny is that? Apparently since this hit the internet Apple has since changed the response to not advertise their biggest competitor!

Check out the original article and a screenshot of Siri’s answer over at wmppoweruser:

http://wmpoweruser.com/siri-knows-which-is-the-best-phone-ever-and-its-not-the-iphone/

Aug 182010
 

So, the question I ask myself today is “What happened to Windows Mobile, and where is it going?”

Back earlier this year I got a corporate Rogers account setup for my company. Got a bunch of Xperia X1’s comped under the contract. I’ve had an old Xperia X1 for years (bought it from europe) and loved it back when it was considered one of the newer Windows Mobile phones, but hey, if you can get the same phone free again, why not right?

Anyways, to cut the story short one of the phones on my account got run over, and then mine just mysteriously died out (issues with the ribbon cable). Both were not repairable. Called Rogers, got one replaced under “Out of Warranty” (it’s been weeks since the order was placed, still no sign), then they ran out of stock (for my phone).

So here I am, this was the perfect opportunity for me to go ahead and see what’s new on the market in regards to Windows Mobile devices. I figured I’d just go ahead and buy a new device unlocked straight out (NOT from the local providers).

In my search I’ve come to the following conclusions:

1) All the new sweet phones don’t support the local HSPA frequencies in North America (high speed internet). I’m guessing there’s not enough interest in North America for WM phones.

2) Not too many companies are selling WM phones anymore in North America.

3) Turns out they released WM 7 and it sounded like it was horrible.

4) WM is still super popular in Europe.

5) People are obsessed with the iPhone, and anything that has the word “Google” or “Android” in it. (I bet they couldn’t even explain why they like the products).

Sure the iPhone is great for consumers, and for the simple professionals who don’t rely on their phone to often, but WTF??? And BlackBerry’s are not an option for me. I don’t have the time, patience, or want to setup my own BES server, maintain it, and learn the BB interface and run into limitations I wouldn’t if I was running Windows Mobile.

I’ve been a long term user of Windows Mobile devices. I love the layout, the way they work, the Exchange Push/Sync capabilities. Even the application development possibilities are sweet! But where are the stinking phones? I’m going to have a breakdown if they become extinct!

Anyways, bought an Xperia X2a since it’s one of the newer (actually not so new) phones that you can buy that work HSPA on 850Mhz. I should be receiving it tomorrow. I’ll probably be posting a review, and notes on configuration, etc…

It’s too bad I couldn’t get my hands on a HTC HD2, or a HTC Touch Pro 2.

I’m finishing this off with a question to Microsoft! What happens next? We need to put more dough in to marketing and development, we need to push this product out the ying yang! Outsource to me, I’ll be able to advise on what needs to be done to get a sweet ass device that has a potential to make some HUGE dough in both business markets and consumer markets.

Jul 082010
 

So, here’s a quick rant…

Last week my brother video calls me. My friend butts in to the conversation.

Friend: OMG dude do you have the new iPhone???

Me: No dude, this is an Xperia X1

Friend: Uhh dude, are you sure. Only the iPhone 4 has video calling, I saw it on a video from their public announcement thing.

Me: Uhh not true, I’m pretty sure what phone I have, haha. Video calling has been around for years and years.

Friend: No dude, it JUST came out.

Epic Fail!

The conversation went on and on. Why do people think video calling is a new thing? And why do people think only the iPhone 4 can do it? From what I heard the Video calling on the iPhone requires Wi-Fi and can’t do it over the cell network. All my phones I’ve had in the past 4 years supported video calling.