Mar 062022
 
Azure AD SSO with Horizon

Whether deploying VDI for the first time or troubleshooting existing Azure AD SSO issues for an existing environment, special consideration must be made for Microsoft Azure AD SSO and VDI.

When you implement and use Microsoft 365 and Office 365 in a VDI environment, you should have your environment configured to handle Azure AD SSO for a seamless user experience, and to avoid numerous login prompts when accessing these services.

Microsoft Azure Active Directory has two different methods for handling SSO (Single Sign On), these include SSO via a Primary Refresh Token (PRT) and Azure Seamless SSO. In this post, I’ll explain the differences, and when to use which one.

Microsoft Azure AD SSO and VDI

What does Azure AD SSO do?

Azure AD SSO allows your domain joined Windows workstations (and Windows Servers) to have a Single Sign On experience so that users can have an single sign-on integrated experience when accessing Microsoft 365 and/or Office 365.

When Azure AD SSO is enabled and functioning, your users will not be prompted nor have to log on to Microsoft 365 or Office 365 applications or services (including web services) as all this will be handled transparently in the background with Azure AD SSO.

For VDI environments, especially non-persistent VDI (VMware Instant Clones), this is an important function so that users are not prompted to login every time they launch an Office 365 application.

Persistent VDI is not complex and doesn’t have any special considerations for Azure AD SSO, as it will function the same way as traditional workstations, however non-persistent VDI requires special planning.

Please Note: Organizations often associate the Office 365 login prompts to activation issues when in fact activation is functioning fine, however Azure AD SSO is either not enabled, incorrect configured, or not functioning which is why the users are being prompted for login credentials every time they establish a new session with non-persistent VDI. After reading this guide, it should allow you to resolve the issue of Office 365 login prompts on VDI non-persistent and Instant Clone VMs.

Azure AD SSO methods

There are two different ways to perform Azure AD SSO in an environment that is not using ADFS. These are:

  • Azure AD SSO via Primary Refresh Token
  • Azure AD Seamless SSO

Both accomplish the same task, but were created at different times, have different purposes, and are used for different scenarios. We’ll explore this below so that you can understand how each works.

Screenshot of a Hybrid Azure AD Joined login
Hybrid Azure AD Joined Login

Fun fact: You can have both Azure AD SSO via PRT and Azure AD Seamless SSO configured at the same time to service your Active Directory domain, devices, and users.

Azure SSO via Primary Refresh Token

When using Azure SSO via Primary Refresh Token, SSO requests are performed by Windows Workstations (or Windows Servers), that are Hybrid Azure AD Joined. When a device is Hybrid Azure AD Joined, it is joined both to your on-premise Active Directory domain, as well registered to your Azure Active Directory.

Azure SSO via Primary Refresh token requires the Windows instance to be running Windows 10 (or later), and/or Windows Server 2016 (or later), as well the Windows instance has to be Azure Hybrid AD joined. If you meet these requirements, SSO with PRT will be performed transparently in the background.

If you require your non-persistent VDI VMs to be Hybrid Azure AD joined and require Azure AD SSO with PRT, special considerations and steps are required:

This includes:

  • Scripts to automatically unjoin non-persistent (Instant Clone) VDI VMs from Azure AD on logoff.
  • Scripts to cleanup old entries on Azure AD

If you properly deploy this, it should function. If you don’t require your non-persistent VDI VMs to be Hybrid Azure AD joined, then Azure AD Seamless SSO may be better for your environment.

Azure AD Seamless SSO

Microsoft Azure AD Seamless SSO after configured and implemented, handles Azure AD SSO requests without the requirement of the device being Hybrid Azure AD joined.

Seamless SSO works on Windows instances instances running Windows 7 (or later, including Windows 10 and Windows 11), and does NOT require the the device to be Hybrid joined.

Seamless SSO allows your Windows instances to access Azure related services (such as Microsoft 365 and Office 365) and provides a single sign-on experience.

This may be the easier method to use when deploying non-persistent VDI (VMware Instant Clones), if you want to implement SSO with Azure, but do not have the requirement of Hybrid AD joining your devices.

Additionally, by using Seamless SSO, you do not need to implement the require log-off and maintenance scripts mentioned in the above section (for Azure AD SSO via PRT).

To use Azure AD Seamless SSO with non-persistent VDI, you must configure and implement Seamless SSO, as well as perform one of the following to make sure your devices do not attempt to Hybrid AD join:

  • Exclude the non-persistent VDI computer OU containers from Azure AD Connect synchronization to Azure AD
  • Implement a registry key on your non-persistent (Instant Clone) golden image, to disable Hybrid Azure AD joining.

To disable Hybrid Azure AD join on Windows, create the registry key on your Windows image below:

HKLM\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\WorkplaceJoin: "BlockAADWorkplaceJoin"=dword:00000001

Conclusion

Different methods can be used to implement SSO with Active Directory and Azure AD as stated above. Use the method that will be the easiest to maintain and provide support for the applications and services you need to access. And remember, you can also implement and use both methods in your environment!

After configuring Azure AD SSO, you’ll still be required to implement the relevant GPOs to configure Microsoft 365 and Office 365 behavior in your environment.

Additional Resources

Please see below for additional information and resources:

Jan 212022
 
sconfig Server Configuration menu

We’re all used to updating our Windows Server operating systems with the Windows Update GUI, but did you know that you can update your server using command prompt and “sconfig”?

The past few years I’ve been managing quite a few Windows Server Core Instances that as we all know, do not have a GUI. In order to update those instances, you need to run Windows Update using the command line, but this method actually also works on normal Windows Server instances with the GUI as well!

Windows Update from CLI (Command Prompt)

Please enjoy this video or read on for why and how!

Why?

Using a GUI is great, however sometimes it’s not needed, and sometimes it even causes problems if it looses the backend connection where it’s pulling the data from. I’ve seen this true on newer Windows operating systems where the Windows Update GUI stops updating and you just sit there thinking the updates are running, when they are actually all complete.

The GUI also creates additional overhead and clutter. If there was an easier alternative to perform this function, wouldn’t it just make sense?

On Windows Server instances that have a GUI, I find it way faster and more responsive to just open an elevated (Administrative) command prompt, and kick off Windows Updates from there.

How

You can use this method on all modern Windows Server versions:

  • Windows Server (with a GUI)
  • Windows Server Core (without a GUI)

This also works with Windows Server Update Services so you can use this method either connecting to Windows Update (Microsoft Update) or Windows Server Update Services (WSUS).

Now lets get started!

  1. Open an Administrative (elevated) command prompt
  2. Run “sconfig” to launch the “Server Configuration” application
    command prompt launch sconfig
  3. Select option “6” to “Download and Install Windows Updates”
    sconfig Server Configuration menu
  4. Choose “A” for all updates, or “R” for recommended updates, and a scan will start
  5. After the available updates are shown, choose “A” for all updates, “N” for no updates, or “S” for single update selection

After performing the above, the updates will download and install.

sconfig Windows Update running
“sconfig” Windows Update downloading and installing

I find it so much easier to use this method when updating many/multiple servers instead of the GUI. Once the updates are complete and you’re back at the “Server Configuration” application, you can use option “13” to restart Windows.

Jan 162022
 

Welcome to Episode 04 of The Tech Journal Vlog at www.StephenWagner.com

The Tech Journal Vlog Episode 04

In this episode

Updates

  • VMware Horizon
    • Apache Log4j Mitigation with VMware Products
  • Homelab Update
    • HPE MSA 2040 vs Synology DS1621+
    • Migrating from MSA 2040 to a Synology DS1621+
    • Synology Benchmarking NVME Cache
  • DST Root CA X3 Expiration
    • End of Life Operating Systems

New Blog/Video Posts

Life Update/Fun Stuff

  • Work
  • Travel
  • Move

Current Projects

  • Synology DS1621+

Don’t forget to like and subscribe!
Leave a comment, feedback, or suggestions!

Dec 022021
 

As I’m watching the Synology: 2022 AND BEYOND event live I wanted to write this post to share with you some of my favorite parts.

For those of you wanting to tune in (while live) or watch the replay you can view it below.

You can also visit: https://event.synology.com/en-us/annual_event to watch the stream (or replay) and find out more information.

DSM 7.0.1 and DSM 7.1

As an IT professional and enthusiast, here’s a list of some of my favorite new features, functionalities and improvements.

DSM 7.0.1

  • High Availability Improvements
    • 40% less time needed for failovers and switchovers
    • 80% less time needed for system updates
  • System Responsiveness and Performance enhancements
    • 56x faster SMB (Windows File Share) searches
    • 70% speed up in application launches
    • 80% faster RAID 6 performance (for double parity RAID)
  • Enhanced Drive Replacement
    • Replace predicted failure/presumed unhealthy/to-be-retired drives with unused healthy drives that are in other bays.
    • Switch without degrading your array/storage pool
  • Auto Drive Replacement
    • Clones predicted failure/presumed unhealthy drive to available hot spare, switching automatically when the drive fails without requiring RAID rebuild time
  • Volume-wide data deduplication (on all flash arrays)
    • Scheduled or Manual Volume Wide Deduplication on all flash volumes
    • Click here for information on supported models and configurations
  • Synology Directory Server
    • Secondary domain controllers provide additional redundancy and availability of directory services
    • Provides ability to deploy additional domain controllers at additional locations

DSM 7.1 (Coming Soon)

  • SMB Multichannel
    • Utilize multiple network links and network connections to combine speed with SMB (Windows File Share) file transfers
    • Provides redundancy and fault tolerance
  • DFS Support over SMB
    • Combine multiple Synology NAS file servers to provide file services to your network using Distributed File System (DFS)
  • Active Insight
    • Numerous updates to make Active Insight more powerful when it comes to managing numerous Synology NAS units.
    • Enhanced control and information on System Updates
    • Suspicious activity detection recognizes suspicious activity on the NAS units (example: unusual login times and locations, unused accounts being used after being idle, failed logins, etc).
    • Task monitoring for Hyper Backup
  • Synology Directory
    • Read-only domain controller support provides ability to deploy read only domain controllers at remote sites that may not be physically secure while providing local cached copies of the directory.

And that’s not all…

Synology has also made numerous improvements to their Data Protection Services, Surveillance suite, Wireless Networking, Synology C2 Cloud, and more, but you’ll have to check it out for yourself. There are tons of other goodies for office workers, small business owners, photography enthusiast, and more that I haven’t included in this list.

Dec 022021
 

In a VMware Horizon environment with DUO MFA configured via RADIUS on the VMware Horizon Connection Server, you may notice authentication issues when logging in through a UAG (Unified Access Gateway) after upgrading to VMware Horizon 8 Version 2111.

During this condition, you can still login and use the connection server directly with MFA working, however all UAG connections will get stuck on authenticating.

Horzion 8 Version 2111 UAG Stuck on Authenticating using DUO MFA (RADIUS)

Disabling MFA and/or RADIUS on the connection server will allow the UAG to function, however MFA will be disabled. This occurs on upgrades to version 2111 of the UAG both when configuring fresh, and importing the JSON configuration backup.

Temporary Fix

Update January 26 2022: VMware has now released version 2111.2 of the Unified Access Gateway which resolves this issue. You can download it here, or view the release notes here.

Update January 12 2022: It appears VMware now has a KB on this issue at: https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/87253.

Temporary workaround/fix: To fix this issue, log on to the UAG and under “Horizon Edge Settings”, configure “Client Encryption Mode” to “Disabled”.

“Client Encryption Mode” is a new setting on UAG 2111 (and UAG 2111.1) that enables new functionality. Disabling this reverts the UAG to the previous behavior of older Unified Access Gateway versions.

More information on “Client Encryption Mode” can be found at https://docs.vmware.com/en/Unified-Access-Gateway/2111/uag-deploy-config/GUID-1B8665A2-485E-4471-954E-56DB9BA540E9.html.

Another workaround is to deploy an older version of the UAG, version 2106. After downgrading, the UAG functions with DUO and RADIUS even though the Connection Server is at version 2111.

If you use an older version of the UAG, please make sure that you mitigate against the Apache log4j vulnerabilities on the UAG using information from the following post: https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/87092.

Oct 112021
 
Windows Server 2022 Logo

Today we’re going to discuss and deploy Active Directory Certificate Services on a Windows Server 2022 Server. Additionally, we’ll also be generating a domain certificate request inside of IIS and then assign the resultant certificate to a WSUS Server.

This video will demonstrate and explain the process of deploying a Windows Server 2022 Certification Authority with AD CS.

Check it out and feel free to leave a comment! Scroll down below for more information and details on the guide.

Windows Server 2022: Active Directory Certificate Services Discussion and Installation Guide

Who’s this guide for

This guide is perfect for a seasoned IT professional or a beginner who is looking at getting experience with Windows Server 2022.

What’s included in the video

In this guide I will walk you through the following:

  • Discussion
    • SSL Certificates (Host verification)
    • Internal Root Certification Authorities (Root CAs)
    • Internal Root CA vs Public Trusted Root CAs
    • HTTPS Scanning (Web Filtering) and SSL Certificates
    • Intermediate Certificate Authorities
    • Why ADCS?
    • AD CS Certificate Templates
    • Encryption
    • Certificate Issuance
  • Demonstration
    • Server Manager Role Installation
    • MMC Snap-in for Certificates (Local Computer)
      • Root CAs
    • Install Active Directory Certificate Services (AD CS)
      • Add Server Role
      • Root CA Trust Discussion
      • AD CS Installation on Domain Controller Installation
      • AD CS Prerequisites
      • Web Enrollment Discussion
      • AD CS and IIS Discussion
    • Install Internet Information Services (IIS) as pre-requisite
    • Configure Active Directory Certificate Services (AD CS)
      • Credentials
      • Role Configuration
      • Enterprise CA vs Standalone CA
      • Root CA vs Subordinate CA
      • Private Key Creation and Cryptographic options
      • Root CA Naming
      • Validity Period
    • Certification Authority MMC Usage
    • Root CA Replication to Domain (“gpupdate /force” and restart)
    • AD CS Certificate Templates Overview
      • Certificate Templates MMC
      • Duplicate and Customize Web Server Certificate Template
      • Enable Auto-Enrollment for Certificate Template
    • Use IIS to request certificate from Active Directory Certification Authority
      • Create Domain Certificate
    • Enable SSL on WSUS Server using Active Directory Certificate Services Certificate
      • Bind new certificate to IIS Web Server
      • Update GPO to reflect SSL URL and port number
      • Run “iisreset” on elevated command prompt
    • Demonstration Summary

What’s required

To get started you’ll need:

  • 1 x Server (Virtual Machine or Physical Server)
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2022 Licensing
  • A running Windows Server 2022 Instance (OSE)
  • A network router and/or firewall

Hardware/Software used in this demonstration

  • VMware vSphere
  • HPE DL360p Gen8 Server
  • Microsoft Windows Server 2022
  • pfSense Firewall
Oct 102021
 
VMware vSphere 7 Logo

In this post, I wanted to go over some Backup and Restore tips and tricks when it comes to VMware vCSA Updates and Upgrades.

We’ve almost all been there, performing an update or upgrade of the VMware vCenter Server Appliance when it fails, and we must restore from a backup. There’s also times where the update or upgrade has been successful, however numerous issues occur afterwards prompting for the requirement of a restore from backup.

In this post, I wanted to briefly go over the methods of backups (and restores) for the vCSA, as well as some Tips and Tricks which might help you out for avoiding failed updates or upgrades in the future!

We all want to avoid a failed update or upgrade! 🙂

vCSA Update Installation
vCSA Update Installation

VMware vCSA Update Tips and Tricks for Backup and Restore

Please enjoy this video version of the blog post:

vCSA Update and Upgrade – Tips and Tricks for Backup and Restore

vCSA Backup methods

There are essentially two backup methods for backing up the vCenter Server Appliance:

  1. vCSA Management Interface Backup
  2. vSphere/ESXi Virtual Machine Snapshot

vCSA Management Interface Backup

If you log in to the vCSA Management Interface, you can configure a scheduled backup that will perform a full backup of your vCSA (and vCenter Server) instance.

This backup can be automatically ran and saved to an HTTP, HTTPS, FTP, FTPS, SFTP, NFS, or SMB destination. It’s a no-brainer if you have a Windows File Server or an NFS datastore.

vCSA Backup Screenshot
vCSA Backup

In the event of a failed update/upgrade or a disaster, this backup can be restored to a new vCSA instance to recover from the failure.

For more information on backups from the vCSA Management Interface, please see https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/7.0/com.vmware.vcenter.install.doc/GUID-8C9D5260-291C-44EB-A79C-BFFF506F2216.html.

For information on restoring a vCSA file based backup, please see https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/7.0/com.vmware.vcenter.install.doc/GUID-F02AF073-7CFD-45B2-ACC8-DE3B6ED28022.html.

vSphere/ESXi Virtual Machine Snapshot

In addition to the scheduled automatic backups configured above, you should snapshot your vCSA appliance VM prior to initiating an update or upgrade. In the event of a failure, you can easily restore the vCSA VM snapshot to get back to a running state.

vCSA Snapshot Screenshot
vCSA Snapshot

Only after you test and confirm the upgrade or update was successful should you delete the snapshot.

You should also have your Backup application or suite performing regularly snapshot based backups of your vCSA.

Additional Tips and Tricks

I have a few very important tips and tricks to share which may help you either avoid a failed update or upgrade, or increase the chances of a successful restore from backup.

  1. Gracefully Shutdown and Restart the vCSA Appliance before Upgrading
  2. Application Consistent Snapshot – Snapshot after graceful shutdown

Let’s dive in to these below.

Gracefully Shutdown and Restart the vCSA Appliance before Upgrading

I noticed that I significantly reduced the amount of failed upgrades by simply gracefully shutting down and restarting the vCenter Server Appliance prior to an upgrade.

This allows you to clear out the memory, virtual memory, and restart all vCenter services prior to starting the upgrade.

Please Note: Make sure that you give the vCSA appliance enough time to boot, start services, and let some of the maintenance tasks run before initiating an upgrade.

Application Consistent Snapshot – Snapshot after graceful shutdown

Most VMware System Administrators I have talked to, usually snapshot the running vCSA appliance and do not snapshot the memory. This creates a crash consistent snapshot.

If you follow my advice above and gracefully shutdown and restart the vCSA appliance, you can use this time to perform a VM snapshot after a graceful shutdown. This will provide you with an application consistent snapshot instead of a crash consistent snapshot.

If you perform an application consistent snapshot by gracefully shutting down the VM prior to creating the snapshot, the virtual machine and database inside of it will be in a cleaner state.

Conclusion

Some of the Tips and Tricks in this post definitely aren’t necessary, however they can help you increase the chance of a successful upgrade, and a successful restore in the event of a failed upgrade.

For more information on upgrading the vCenter Server Appliance, please visit https://docs.vmware.com/en/VMware-vSphere/7.0/com.vmware.vcenter.upgrade.doc/GUID-30485437-B107-42EC-A0A8-A03334CFC825.html.

Oct 092021
 

One of the new real cool features of the Synology C2 Cloud and Synology DSM 7.0 is the ability to back your Synology DiskStation NAS up to the cloud.

Using the Synology’s “C2 Storage” service, you can use Synology Hyper Backup on DSM 7.0 to backup your your File Shares, NAS, applications, and data to the cloud.

Below, I will show the process of creating a Hyper Backup Backup task to backup a few Synology File Shares to the Synology C2 Storage Service.

NAS Backup (and Restore) with Synology C2 Cloud Video

For a full video guide and demonstration, please enjoy this video! Please continue scrolling for a text guide (with images).

Synology DiskStation NAS Backup (and Restore) with Synology C2 Storage Cloud!

Backup NAS to Synology C2 Storage

It’s very easy to back your NAS up to the cloud. Here’s a quick guide showing how it’s done.

We’re going to assume you already have some File Shares configured on your NAS. These can be Windows File Shares, NFS Exports, and even Active Backup for Business storage repositories. In my case, I want to back up 2 Windows File Shares to the Synology C2 Storage service.

  1. Open Hyper Backup
  2. If you have no existing backup jobs, the “Backup Wizard” should automatically open to configure a new job. If you have existing jobs, select the “+” on the top left of the window.
  3. Under “Backup Destination”, choose “Synology C2 Storage”.
    Hyper Backup Destination
  4. This will open a new window asking you to log on to the Synology C2 Storage Service. You may have to create a new account, or log in with your existing Synology credentials. From here you can start a free trial.
    Synology C2 Storage - Get Free Trial Now
  5. Choose a subscription and plan. You should get a 30-day free trial.
    Synology C2 Storage - Select your C2 subscription
  6. Confirm your subscription
    Synology C2 Storage - Confirm Subscription
  7. Accept the TOS (Terms of Service)
    Synology C2 Storage - Terms of Service
  8. You must now “Grant access to C2 Storage”. This will allow your user account to access the C2 Storage service.
    Synology C2 Storage - Grant Access
  9. You will now be presented with information on your Synology C2 Storage Account
    Synology C2 Storage Account Information
  10. You will now be redirected back to Hyper Backup. You’ll need to create a name for the new backup task destination directory.
    Hyper Backup Destination Settings
  11. Here’s where you will configure which File Shares (or volumes) to backup to Synology C2.
    Hyper Backup Choose Data Backup Sources
  12. You also have the ability to backup Synology Applications. This is helpful should you wish to backup your entire Synology NAS to Synology’s C2 cloud. I’m only doing shares, so I hit next without selecting anything.
    Hyper Backup Application Backup
  13. Now we will configure the Backup Task settings. This includes the task name, notifications, file change logs, bandwidth limits, backup schedule, and integrity check schedule. We can also “Enable client-side encryption” which we will use to encrypt the data on the cloud.
    Hyper Backup Backup Settings
  14. After proceeding, we will now configure backup rotation settings. I enabled backup rotation with “Smart Recycle”.
    Hyper Backup Rotation Settings
  15. If you enabled encryption, you will be prompted to download your encryption key. Save this file in a safe location as you will need it in the event your NAS fails and you need to access your cloud storage.
    Hyper Backup Synology C2 Encryption PEM key file

And that’s it! You have now configured your NAS to backup to Synology C2 Cloud!

Hyper Backup NAS Backup to Synology C2 Cloud
Hyper Backup NAS Backup to Synology C2 Cloud

We have now configured the backup job. Let’s go ahead and kick off a backup by clicking on “Back up now”.

And that’s it! After some time, your backup should complete and you data should be safe on the Synology C2 Cloud.

What happens when your run of out space

This is a question many of you will be asking, and I was curious myself. I went ahead and uploaded a bunch of garbage data to max out my plan.

Synology Hyper Backup C2 Storage - Not enough quota available on the target
Synology Hyper Backup C2 Storage – Not enough quota available on the target

To my surprise Synology allowed me to exceed my plan by a decent amount of storage until the backup job went in to a “Suspended” state reporting “Not enough quota available on the target”. I actually exceeded the storage by 128GB!!! This is extremely generous!

Synology C2 Storage - Storage overage
Synology C2 Storage – Storage overage

To find out how well the NAS would recover from this situation, I logged on to the Synology C2 Storage service and increased my purchased storage. I was able to simply click on “Action” and “Resume” the backup without any issues… It actually resumed where it left off.

Conclusion

The Synology C2 Storage Cloud service is a great option for backing up your DiskStation NAS and all your important files to the cloud. In my case I use my NAS as a backup, and then further backup my NAS both to a removable hard drive, and the Synology C2 Cloud, keeping me compliant with the 3-2-1 backup rule.

The pricing is amazing and there’s extra cost to backup and restore, which means no upload or download costs. They even provide de-duplication so you’re not paying to store duplicated data.

As part of the backup process, Hyper Backup only copies over blocks of data and files that have changed, which significantly helps bandwidth usage as only what’s changed is copied.

I highly recommend using Synology C2 Storage with your Synology DiskStation NAS!

Oct 092021
 
Windows 11 Logo

When attempting to do a fresh install of Windows 11 using the ISO, you may receive the message “This PC can’t run Windows 11”. Additionally, “This PC doesn’t meet the minimum system requirements to install this version of Windows.”

Windows 11 has a new set of minimum system requirements and these include certain CPUs as well as a TPM 2.0 (Trusted Platform Module Version 2.0) chip, Secure Boot, and 8GB of RAM.

If you’re trying to do an upgrade instead of a fresh install, please see Windows 11 Upgrade – This PC doesn’t currently meet Windows 11 system requirements.

Below you’ll find an explanation of the problem, and two different methods to workaround it.

The Problem

You’ll see this message while performing a fresh install if your system does not meet the minimum requirements.

Windows 11 Fresh Install - This PC can't run Windows 11
Windows 11 Fresh Install – This PC can’t run Windows 11

Just like my previous post on upgrading to Windows 11, you’ll encounter this when attempting a fresh install because some pre-requisite checks are failing:

  • CPU is not supported
  • Windows 11 Installer cannot find a TPM 2.0 chip
  • Secure Boot is not enabled
  • EFI or UEFI is Required

One thing to note is that you may see these messages even if your system has a TPM 2.0 chip.

Most computers purchased in the last 6 years probably have a TPM 2 chip that just needs to be enabled via the system UEFI/EFI. If you boot to your UEFI, you can attempt to enable the TPM 2.0 chip.

It may already be enabled, however it may be configured to run at version 1.2. If this is the case, change it to version 2.0. You’ll also need to make sure you have “Secure boot” enabled.

If this doesn’t work, please see below for multiple workarounds.

The Fix

At this point in time, there are two different methods to workaround the minimum system requirements:

  1. Method 1 – Use Rufus to create a modified Windows 11 Installer from ISO and disable the TPM 2.0, Secure Boot, and 8GB of RAM requirement.
  2. Method 2 – Use native Windows 11 installer and ISO to modify registry during Windows Setup.

You can either either method, depending on which one you may find easier or more convenient.

Method 1 – Use Rufus to create a modified Windows 11 Installer from ISO and disable the TPM 2.0, Secure Boot, and 8GB of RAM requirement.

You can use a utility called “Rufus” (Reliable USB Formatting Utility, with Source) to convert the Windows 11 ISO in to a bottable USB key to install Windows.

Using the latest version of Rufus, you can modify the Windows 11 Setup installer to bypass the requirements for TPM 2.0, Secure Boot, and 8GB of RAM.

To use this method, you’ll need the following files:

Please enjoy this video demonstrating the process:

Windows 11 Fresh Install – TPM and Secure Boot Bypass for “This PC can’t run Windows 11”

To use this method as a workaround:

  1. Download Rufus and place in a folder
  2. Download Windows 11 ISO and place in a folder
  3. Insert USB key that is larger than the size of the Windows 11 ISO (larger than 5.5GB)
  4. Open Rufus
  5. Select your USB key under “Device”
  6. Under “Boot Selection”, click on “SELECT”
  7. Navigate to and select the Windows 11 ISO file
  8. Under “Image option”, choose “Extended Windows 11 Installation (no TPM/no Secure Boot/8GB- RAM”
  9. Click “Start”.
    PLEASE NOTE: This will erase and repartition your USB drive. All existing data on the USB drive will be deleted.
Rufus – Windows 11 Fresh Install TPM, Secure Boot, and RAM bypass

Now simply wait for the USB key to be created. It can take 30-90 minutes depending on the speed of your USB drive.

Once you have created the USB key, make sure your computer is configured to use UEFI and make sure you disable Secure Boot in the UEFI.

Simply boot from the USB Key your created above, and install Windows 11.

Method 2 – Use native Windows 11 installer and ISO to modify registry during Windows Setup.

Bypass the check for TPM 2.0

If you don’t have TPM 2.0 or it’s not working, you can disable the TPM 2.0 check on the Windows 11 installer. Please note, you still require TPM 1.2 for this bypass to function. This workaround only disables the requiremnt for TPM 2.0. You still need to have Secure Boot enabled, and you must have a TPM 1.2 chip.

To do this, boot from the Windows 10 ISO:

Windows 11 Installer
Windows 11 – Installer

When you see the above screen, press “SHIFT + F10” and a Windows Command Prompt should open.

From the command prompt, type “regedit” and press enter.

Windows 11 Installer with command prompt and Registry Editor "regedit"
Windows 11 Installer – Registry Editor “regedit”

Now we must create a registry key called “MoSetup” and a DWORD Value to disable the TPM and CPU check.

  1. Navigate to “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup”
  2. Right click on “Setup”, select “New”, and choose “Key”, name it “MoSetup”
  3. Navigate to “MoSetup”
  4. On the right pane, right-click an empty space, select “New”, and select “DWORD (32-bit) Value”
  5. Name it: “AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU” (without quotations)
  6. Set it to “1” (without quotations)

After performing the above, it should look like this.

Windows 11 Installer - MoSetup and AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU
Windows 11 Installer – MoSetup and AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU

Now simply close the Registry Editor, type “exit” to close out of the command prompt and continue with the Windows 11 Installer.

After performing the above, you should now be able to successfully perform a fresh install of Windows 11 with the TPM and CPU check disabled.

Oct 072021
 
Windows 11 Logo

When attempting to upgrade to Windows 11, you may receive the message “This PC doesn’t currently meet Windows 11 system requirements”.

Windows 11 has a new set of minimum system requirements and these include certain CPUs as well as a TPM 2.0 (Trusted Platform Module Version 2.0) chip.

I ran in to this issue on a Lenovo X1 Carbon as well as an HP Z240 Workstation. The Lenovo X1 Carbon does have a TPM 2 chip, however still would not install.

If you’re trying to a fresh installation instead of an upgrade, please see Windows 11 Fresh Install – This PC can’t run Windows 11 for instructions on performing a Fresh install with TPM and Secure Boot bypass.

The Problem

You’ll see this message if your system doesn’t meet the minimum requirements.

Windows 11 installer failing with "Windows 11 - This PC doesn't currently meet Windows 11 system requirements"
Windows 11 – This PC doesn’t currently meet Windows 11 system requirements

On most systems, you’ll see the following 2 prequisite checks fail:

  • “The processor isn’t supported for this version of Windows”
  • “The PC must support TPM 2.0.”

One thing to note is that you may see these messages even if your system has a TPM 2.0 chip.

You’ll also need to make sure your system has UEFI/EFI and has Secure Boot enabled.

The Fix

You have TPM 2.0 but can’t upgrade to Windows 11

Try to check and see if you have a TPM 2.0 chip. Most systems purchased in the last 6 years probably have a TPM 2 chip that just needs to be enabled via the system BIOS or UEFI.

If you boot to your BIOS/UEFI, you can attempt to enable the TPM 2.0 chip.

You may also already have it enabled, however it is configured to run at version 1.2. If this is the case, change it to version 2.0.

You’ll also need to make sure you have “Secure boot” enabled.

Bypass the check for TPM 2.0

If you don’t have TPM 2.0, you can disable the TPM 2.0 check on the Windows 11 installer. Please note, you still require TPM 1.2 for this bypass to function.

To do this, we must make a registry key.

  1. Start -> Run -> “regedit.exe” (without quotations)
  2. Navigate to “HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\Setup\MoSetup”
  3. On the right pane, right-click an empty space, select “New”, and select “DWORD (32-bit) Value”
  4. Name it: “AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU” (without quotations)
  5. Set it to “1” (without quotations)

After creating this, it should appear like so:

REG_DWORD: AllowUpgradesWithUnsupportedTPMOrCPU set to “1”

After setting this you should now be able re-launch the Windows 11 installer, and successfully install Windows 11. You’ll now notice the new message below:

Windows 11 – Bypass TPM and CPU Disclaimer

Simply “Accept” the warning and continue!

Please Note: Microsoft has warned that by using this TPM 2.0 bypass, you may run in to compatibility issues: “Your device might malfunction due to these compatibility or other issues. Devices that do not meet these system requirements will no longer be guaranteed to receive updates, including but not limited to security updates.”

You’ll see this disclaimer and warning on the Windows 11 installer after enabling the TPM 2.0 check bypass.

Additional Resources